Wedding picture of Tokutaro and mail order bride, Tori circa 1922.
Wedding picture of Tokutaro and mail order bride, Tori circa 1922.

Tokutaro (Pop) Tsuyuki arrived in Canada in 1907.  He was acquainted with Jiro Inouye, often referred to as the Japanese Mayor for Maple Ridge, who encouraged him to acquire land and make his own living rather than depend on non-Japanese for jobs.

He acquired property in Albion and began growing soft fruits including strawberries, raspberries and loganberries.  In 1917, Tokutaro sent to Japan for a bride he had only seen in pictures.  Tori Hara left everything she had ever known behind and came to this strange place to marry a man she knew nearly nothing about.  As soon as they were married, she joined Tokutaro on his place in Albion where she helped with the fruit-growing and greenhouse operation while bearing and raising six children, all of whom were delivered by her husband.  He even delivered a few babies for Japanese neighbours.  This male midwifery was certainly unusual, even in the days when doctors were scarce, and Tokutaro was justly proud of this particular accomplishment.

View of the Tsuyuki Greenhouses from the south in 1942.  Taka Tsuyuki climbed up Mattson’s tree to get this shot, which was taken just prior to the relocation.
View of the Tsuyuki Greenhouses from the south in 1942. Taka Tsuyuki climbed up Mattson’s tree to get this shot, which was taken just prior to the relocation.

In 1928 the family built their first greenhouse on the Albion property.  After a fire and rebuilding, the greenhouse operation was a thriving business by 1939 when the world of the Japanese in Maple Ridge began to fall apart.

In 1942, the Japanese were ordered to report to Hastings Park in Vancouver, where they were given a choice in their fate.  This included men like Tokutaro Tsuyuki, who had served Canada in WWI.  No acknowledgement was made of their earlier service.  Their choice was between living in an internment camp for the duration or starting a new business in the interior by arrangement with land owners.  Tokutaro chose the latter and moved his family to Lillooet where they began another greenhouse operation to grow tomatoes on the property of a Lillooet farmer.  In exchange for their use of the land, they were to grow and process hay for the farmer’s livestock.

The Tsuyuki family.  From left:  Hiro, Taka, Yuriko, Tori with Roy in front, Tokutaru (Pop), Tad, Koo, and Jim.  They are posed in front of their farm truck at Albion.
The Tsuyuki family. From left: Hiro, Taka, Yuriko, Tori with Roy in front, Tokutaru (Pop), Tad, Koo, and Jim. They are posed in front of their farm truck at Albion.

In 1949, after having buried his wife in Lillooet, Tokutaro and his children left their second greenhouse business and returned to the coast to attempt to regain their former property.  Their neighbour had taken over their operation and had promised to sell it back for what he had paid, but he reneged as the Tsuyuki greenhouses had been fully integrated into his own successful operation and he was not willing to part with them.  Tokutaro swallowed his anger and walked away.

In 1950, for the third time, Tokutaro began again in Surrey with the help of his son Taka (Norm) and son-in-law Jim Yoshizawa.

Norm (Taka) Tsuyuki, his wife Irene, and daughter visiting the Maple Ridge Museum display at the library just prior to his death in 1998.
Norm (Taka) Tsuyuki, his wife Irene, and daughter visiting the Maple Ridge Museum display at the library just prior to his death in 1998.

Because of the internment of the Japanese families, it has been a real struggle for the Maple Ridge Museum to get hold of their stories.  With the Tsuyuki family, we were very fortunate that Tokutaro’s son, Taka (Norm), wanted their story told.  Sad to say, shortly after sharing his story, Norm passed away.