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Trench Art

The Maple Ridge Museum has two pieces of Trench Art; one, a brass vase made from a German shell casing from World War I. There are handles on each side, with insignia from a WWI uniform welded on the front. The other, is made from a horse hoof and grenade. The piece belonged to Andre Marc (1882-1959), a pioneer of Yennadon.

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Trench Art is an enigmatic term. One gets the image of soldiers creating art in mud spattered trenches, however, items made during wartime where in fact created at a distance from the front lines. This is why it is best to think of Trench Art in terms of a concept. Dr. Nick Saunders’s, who has written one of the few books on the subject, Trench Art: A Brief History and Guide, describes it as “any object made by any person, from any material that are or have been associated with armed conflict.” Items have either been created by soldiers, prisoners of wars, or by skilled artisans. These three groups have served as a classification system for the Trench Art world, each category added new depth to not only the materials, but the story behind the object.

Although Trench Art has taken its name largely from World War I, it existed well before 1914, and is still made today. The first citied example dates back to the Napoleonic Wars. Items largely consisted of metal, cloth, bone and wood. Given the variety of items made, it makes it easier to dismiss all objects simply as “curious junk from war”, however, each individual object is rich in symbolism and even irony, which also tells a story about family history.

The Maple Ridge Museum has two pieces of Trench Art; one, a brass vase made from a German shell casing from World War I. There are handles on each side, with insignia from a WWI uniform welded on the front. The other, is made from a horse hoof and grenade. The piece belonged to Andre Marc (1882-1959), a pioneer of Yennadon.

Andre Marc came to the area by way of Victoria, where he  met his his wife, Alice Claudie Pichon in 1907. Originally both from France, Andre Marc was the son of a lawyer, Alice, the daughter of a gunsmith who was serving as France’s consul in Victoria. Both had a keen sense of adventure, and when they married two years later, they procured a homestead of 175 acres north of Haney near Loon Lake in 1909 (which is now part of the UBC Research Forest). Although he and his family left shortly after in 1914, when Marc joined the French Army to fight in WWI, they returned to their homestead in 1927, where he lived and worked until his death in 1959. While in the army Marc served for four years as a Major, and was awarded the French Military Cross for gallantry.

Friends of Marc made this piece as a reminder of his horse, Carrington. During a battle at Reumont, France on the 19th of October 1919, a grenade was launched at Marc. Carrington absorbed the impact, and saved Marc’s life. This piece was made as a memorial to the horse.

Hair Art
Accessories, Object
Hair Art
Wooden Shoes
Accessories, Object
Wooden Shoes
Bed Pig
Household Items, Object
Bed Pig
Doll Diorama
Object, Toys
Doll Diorama
Finger Purse
Accessories, Object
Finger Purse
Japanese Collection
Object
Japanese Collection
Opium Scale
Object
Opium Scale
School Bell
Object
School Bell
Spring Board
Object
Spring Board
Swing Toaster
Household Items, Object
Swing Toaster
Teacups
Household Items, Object
Teacups
Telephone Exchange
Object
Telephone Exchange
Thomas Haney’s Cane
Object
Thomas Haney’s Cane
Fortune Teller Doll
Object
Fortune Teller Doll
Trench Art
Object
Trench Art
Byrnes Collection
Object
Byrnes Collection
Cannon Ball
Object
Cannon Ball
Phonograph
Object
Phonograph
Comp-tometer
Business, Object
Comp-tometer